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Interior design trend spot: What is Lagom? image

Interior design trend spot: What is Lagom?

Blogs, Knowledge Centre /

If you’ve landed on this blog post, we will bet our bottom dollar that you’re familiar with the term ‘Hygge‘ – the Danish concept of keeping cosy, wherever and however that may be. Hygge took the world of interior design (commercial and residential) by storm and the next in line from the Scandi concept archives is ‘Lagom‘.

Lagom as an office interior design trend for 2020

What does Lagom mean?

The literal translation of ‘Lagom‘ from it’s Swedish origin into English is: “enough, sufficient, adequate, just right”. It’s definition is quite the mouthful but in concept, it’s actually all about simplicity and minimalism. It means living in moderation rather than abundance and being frugal rather than wasteful. When used in a sentence, you might say something along the lines of “just a lagom amount of furniture was introduced into the space”.

Just like Hygge, Lagom is a Scandinavian mantra that has been around for many years but which was recently infiltrated into the mainstream by an IKEA marketing campaign. It’s promotion of balance and function over lavishness and desire applies to almost every aspect of life, from food and fashion to travel and pastimes. Another place we’re seeing the practices of Lagom gain traction is in the modern working world and the physical workspace of today.

Will Lagom be a big office interior design trend for 2020?

The simple answer to this question is: yes, it already is – you just might not realise that that’s what you’re looking at. So, keep reading to explore the many ways in which Lagom is manifesting itself in office interior design and workplace culture

Sustainable furniture & design schemes

A huge part of the Lagom concept is taking measures to become more ‘low-impact’ and be more mindful and proactive about the effects you’re having on the environment. This includes reducing plastic use and carbon balancing non-responsible processes but also making the effort to seek out more sustainable products and suppliers. This includes eco-friendly fabrics and looking further back in the supply chain to make sure production processes are ethical.

It’s also about making less, more and in terms of workplace fit out and design, this comes in the form of more multi-use products and work settings. The Nomique ‘Whale Table’ pictured below is the perfect amalgamation of both as it’s made from recycled plastic water bottled dredged from Amsterdam canals and is also applicable to a whole host of different functions, from boardroom to brainstorm.

nomique-plastic-whale-table-clerkenwell-design-week-2019

More upcycling, less waste

To make the commercial design industry more ‘Lagom’, many designers and manufacturers are now looking towards upcycling, recycling and repurposing. Doing this gives the product a new lease of life which means less money spending, less waste going to landfill and a much lower impact on the environment. This might involve reupholstering furniture, refurbishing a product or retro-fitting certain parts to refresh its functionality; or it could simply mean relocating a product to a different part of the workspace to give it a new purpose.

A more compact supply chain

It’s a wonderful thing that in the connected modern world, we have access to a whole plethora of different products and manufacturers around the globe. This accessibility then makes for eclectic design products which look incredible but certainly aren’t ‘Lagom’ – there’s both a cost and environmental implication to the diverse choice available to designers today. Shortening the supply chain and using less manufacturers (and more local suppliers) will reduce project miles and lower costs.

Less clutter, more (head) space

As a Scandinavian concept, Lagom design is naturally going to be hugely influenced by the minimal Scandi aesthetic that has been so popular in homes and workplaces for a long time now. Part of this is implementing a more essential approach to space-planning and design to limit waste but also to keep environments free of the kind of clutter which has been proven to have a detrimental impact on productivity and employee wellbeing. Fostering more minimal environments will boost concentration and promote better mental health in the workplace.

Keeping excess at bay in terms of furniture and decor is a great way to streamline spending, optimise available space and start living and working more in line with the Lagom way of life.

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